Refereed journal article or data article (A1)

Persistence of sleep difficulties for over 16 years amongst 66,948 working-aged adults




List of Authors: Saltychev Mikhail, Juhola Juhani, Arokoski Jari, Ervasti Jenni, Kivimäki Mika, Pentti Jaana, Stenholm Sari, Myllyntausta Saana, Vahtera Jussi

Publisher: Public Library of Science

Publication year: 2021

Journal: PLoS ONE

Journal name in source: PloS one

Journal acronym: PLoS One

Volume number: 16

Issue number: 11

eISSN: 1932-6203

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0259500

URL: https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0259500

Self-archived copy’s web address: https://research.utu.fi/converis/portal/detail/Publication/68380688


Abstract

The objective was to investigate the persistence of sleep difficulties for over 16 years amongst a population of working age. In this prospective cohort study, a group-based trajectory analysis of repeated surveys amongst 66,948 employees in public sector (mean age 44.7 [SD 9.4] years, 80% women) was employed. The main outcome measure was sleep difficulties based on Jenkins Sleep Scale (JSS). Up to 70% of the respondents did not experience sleep difficulties whereas up to 4% reported high frequency of notable sleep difficulties through the entire 16-year follow-up. Heavy drinking predicted sleep difficulties (OR 2.3 95% CI 1.6 to 3.3) except for the respondents younger than 40 years. Smoking was associated with sleep difficulties amongst women younger than 40 years (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.0 to 1.5). Obesity was associated with sleep difficulties amongst men (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.4 to 2.7) and women (OR 1.2, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.3) of middle age and amongst women older than 50 (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.2 to 1.8) years. Physical inactivity predicted sleep difficulties amongst older men (OR 1.3, 95% CI 1.1 to 1.6). In this working-age population, sleep difficulties showed a great persistence over time. In most of the groups, the level of sleep difficulties during the follow-up was almost solely dependent on the level of initial severity. Depending on sex and age, increasing sleep problems were sometimes associated with high alcohol consumption, smoking, obesity and physical inactivity, but the strength of these associations varied.


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Last updated on 2022-07-04 at 16:21