A1 Journal article – refereed

Orthostatic Hypotension is a Risk Factor for Falls Among Older Adults: 3-Year Follow-Up




List of Authors: Hohtari-Kivimäki Ulla, Salminen Marika, Vahlberg Tero, Kivelä Sirkka-Liisa

Publisher: Elsevier

Publication year: 2021

Journal: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

Journal name in source: Journal of the American Medical Directors Association

eISSN: 1525-8610

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2021.07.010

URL: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jamda.2021.07.010


Abstract

Objectives
To assess the prevalence of orthostatic hypotension (OH) and the association of OH with the risk of falls among community-dwelling older adults with a previous fall.
Design
Longitudinal study.
Setting and Participants
The subjects (n = 561) were participants in fall prevention conducted in western Finland.
Methods
Blood pressure (BP) was measured in supine position and at 30 seconds and 3 minutes after standing. The participants were divided according to the consensus definition to an OH group (OHG) and a non-OH group (non-OHG). Falls were recorded by fall diaries during 12 months. Falls requiring treatment were gathered from health center and hospital registers during 12 and 36 months.
Results
The prevalence of OH was 23.4% (30 seconds) and 7.3% (3 minutes). The 30-second measurement showed that the incidence of falls and that of falls requiring treatment were significantly higher in OHG compared with non-OHG during 12 months. After adjustments, the incidence of falls remained higher in all 5 adjusted models whereas that of falls requiring treatment remained higher only after adjustment for functional balance. The 3-minute measurement showed that the incidence of falls was higher in OHG compared with non-OHG during 12 months and remained higher after adjustments for functional balance and for age and functional balance. During the 36-month follow-up, OH measured at 30 seconds or 3 minutes after standing was not associated with the occurrence of falls leading to treatment.
Conclusions and Implications
OH at 30 seconds or 3 minutes after standing is associated with a greater risk for falling within 12 months in older adults. The 30-second blood pressure measurement is more reliable to detect the risk than the 3-minute measurement. The results support the usability of 30-second measurement in determining OH and the risk for falling among older persons.


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Last updated on 2021-13-09 at 17:14