A1 Journal article – refereed

Factors Associated with Financial Security, Food Security and Quality of Daily Lives of Residents in Nigeria during the First Wave of the COVID-19 Pandemic




List of Authors: Folayan MO, Ibigbami O, El Tantawi M, Brown B, Aly NM, Ezechi O, Abeldaño GF, Ara E, Ayanore MA, Ellakany P, Gaffar B, Al-Khanati NM, Idigbe I, Ishabiyi AO, Jafer M, Khan AT, Khalid Z, Lawal FB, Lusher J, Nzimande NP, Osamika BE, Quadri MFA, Roque M, Al-Tammemi AB, Yousaf MA, Virtanen JI, Zuñiga RAA, Okeibunor JC, Nguyen AL.

Publication year: 2021

Journal: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Volume number: 18

Issue number: 15

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18157925


Abstract

An online survey was conducted to identify factors associated with financial insecurity, food insecurity and poor quality of daily lives of adults in Nigeria during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. The associations between the outcome (experience of financial loss, changes in food intake and impact of the pandemic on daily lives) and the explanatory (age, sex, education level, anxiety, depression, HIV status) variables were determined using logistic regression analysis. Of the 4439 respondents, 2487 (56.0%) were financially insecure, 907 (20.4%) decreased food intake and 4029 (90.8%) had their daily life negatively impacted. Males (AOR:0.84), people who felt depressed (AOR:0.62) and people living with HIV -PLHIV- (AOR:0.70) had significantly lower odds of financial insecurity. Older respondents (AOR:1.01) had significantly higher odds of financial insecurity. Those depressed (AOR:0.62) and PLHIV (AOR:0.55) had significantly lower odds of reporting decreased food intake. Respondents who felt anxious (AOR:0.07), depressed (AOR: 0.48) and who were PLHIV (AOR:0.68) had significantly lower odds of reporting a negative impact of the pandemic on their daily lives. We concluded the study findings may reflect a complex relationship between financial insecurity, food insecurity, poor quality of life, mental health, and socioeconomic status of adults living in Nigeria during the COVID-19 pandemic.


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Last updated on 2021-12-10 at 13:40