Refereed review article in scientific journal (A2)

65 years of influenza surveillance by a World Health Organization-coordinated global network




List of AuthorsThedi Ziegler, Awandha Mamahit, Nancy J. Cox

PublisherWILEY

Publication year2018

JournalInfluenza and Other Respiratory Viruses

Journal name in sourceINFLUENZA AND OTHER RESPIRATORY VIRUSES

Journal acronymINFLUENZA OTHER RESP

Volume number12

Issue number5

Start page558

End page565

Number of pages8

ISSN1750-2640

eISSN1750-2659

DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/irv.12570

Self-archived copy’s web addresshttps://research.utu.fi/converis/portal/detail/Publication/35460051


Abstract
The 1918 devastating influenza pandemic left a lasting impact on influenza experts and the public, and the importance of global influenza surveillance was soon recognized. The World Health Organization (WHO) Global Influenza Surveillance Network (GISN) was founded in 1952 and renamed to Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System in 2011 upon the adoption by the World Health Assembly, of the Pandemic Influenza Preparedness Framework for the Sharing of Influenza Viruses and Access to Vaccines and Other Benefits (PIP Framework). The importance of influenza surveillance had been recognized and promoted by experts prior to the years leading up to the establishment of WHO. In the 65years of its existence, the Network has grown to comprise 143 National Influenza Centers recognized by WHO, 6 WHO Collaborating Centers, 4 Essential Regulatory Laboratories, and 13 H5 Reference Laboratories. The Network has proven its excellence throughout these 65years, providing detailed information on circulating seasonal influenza viruses, as well as immediate response to the influenza pandemics in 1957, 1968, and 2009, and to threats caused by animal influenza viruses and by zoonotic transmission of coronaviruses. For its central role in global public health, the Network has been highly recognized by its many partners and by international bodies. Several generations of world-renowned influenza scientists have brought the Network to where it is now and they will take it forward to the future, as influenza will remain a preeminent threat to humans and to animals.

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Last updated on 2022-07-04 at 16:59