A1 Journal article – refereed
The role of syllables in word recognition among beginning Finnish readers – Evidence from eye movements during reading




Subtitle: Evidence from eye movements during reading
List of Authors: Häikiö Tuomo, Hyönä Jukka, Bertram Raymond
Publisher: ROUTLEDGE JOURNALS, TAYLOR & FRANCIS LTD
Publication year: 2015
Journal: Journal of Cognitive Psychology
Journal name in source: JOURNAL OF COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY
Journal acronym: J COGN PSYCHOL
Volume number: 27
Issue number: 5
ISSN: 2044-5911
eISSN: 2044-592X

Abstract


The eye movements of Finnish first and second graders were monitored as they read sentences where polysyllabic words were either hyphenated at syllable boundaries, alternatingly coloured (every second syllable black, every second red) or had no explicit syllable boundary cues (e.g., ta-lo vs. talo vs. talo = house). The results showed that hyphenation at syllable boundaries slows down reading of first and second graders even though syllabification by hyphens is very common in Finnish reading instruction, as all first-grade textbooks include hyphens at syllable boundaries. When hyphens were positioned within a syllable (t-alo vs. ta-lo), beginning readers were even more disrupted. Alternate colouring did not affect reading speed, no matter whether colours signalled syllable structure or not. The results show that beginning Finnish readers prefer to process polysyllabic words via syllables rather than letter by letter. At the same time they imply that hyphenation encourages sequential syllable processing, which slows down the reading of children, who are already capable of parallel syllable processing or recognising words directly via the whole-word route.


Last updated on 2019-29-01 at 22:16