A2 Review article in a scientific journal
Effectiveness of social media interventions for people with schizophrenia: A systematic review and meta-analysis




List of Authors: Välimäki M, Athanasopoulou C, Lahti M, Adams CE
Publication year: 2016
Journal: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Volume number: 18
Issue number: 4

Abstract

Background: Recent studies
have shown that people with serious mental disorders spend time online
for the purposes of disclosure, information gathering, or gaming.
However, coherent information on the effects of social media on
treatment for people with schizophrenia is still lacking.

Objective: Our
aim was to determine the effects of social media interventions for
supporting mental health and well-being among people with schizophrenia.

Methods: A
systematic review and meta-analysis were undertaken to determine the
effects of social media interventions for supporting mental health and
well-being among people with schizophrenia. Ten databases were searched,
while search parameters included English-only manuscripts published
prior to June 25, 2015. Study appraisals were made independently by 2
reviewers, and qualitative and quantitative syntheses of data were
conducted.

Results: Out
of 1043 identified records, only two randomized studies of moderate
quality (three records, total N=331, duration 12 months) met the
inclusion criteria. Participants were people with schizophrenia spectrum
or an affective disorder. Social media was used as part of Web-based
psychoeducation, or as online peer support (listserv and bulletin
board). Outcome measures included perceived stress, social support, and
disease-related distress. At 3 months, participants with schizophrenia
in the intervention group reported lower perceived stress levels (P=.04) and showed a trend for a higher perceived level of social support (P=.06).
However, those who reported more positive experiences with the peer
support group also reported higher levels of psychological distress (P=.01).

Conclusions: Despite
using comprehensive searches from 10 databases, we found only two
studies, whereas numerous reports have been published citing the
benefits of social media in mental health. Findings suggest the effects
of social media interventions are largely unknown. More research is
needed to understand the effects of social media, for users with and
without mental illness, in order to determine the impact on mental
well-being ofsocial media use as well as its risks.

Last updated on 2019-30-04 at 15:12

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